Gulf Stream Search > Mish Mosh > Career advice > Food for Thought #8 * Resume tips that help you stand out from other job seekers.

Food for Thought #8 * Resume tips that help you stand out from other job seekers.

In nearly every conversation we have with talented individuals in the food & beverage industry, we’re asked for resume tips that help them stand out from other job seekers.

It’s harder and harder to stand out today – just look at Twitter or your Linked In feed.  People are doing outrageous things just to get attention.

In nearly every conversation we have with talented individuals in the food & beverage industry, we’re asked for resume tips that help them stand out from other job seekers.

It’s harder and harder to stand out today – just look at Twitter or your Linked In feed.  People are doing outrageous things just to get attention.

Explaining your career in 1-2 pages is challenging as well – however, your resume is your first chance to make a strong impression.  You literally have seconds to make your point.

As you consider new job opportunities, here are some resume tips to help you stand out from other job seekers.

Hiring managers are not interested in what activities you do on a daily basis – they are interested in how well you perform in those activities.

Depending on where you are in your career, it may be difficult to explain what impact you had in your role, but cutting and pasting your job description is not going to differentiate you from one of your peers.

Here are some questions to ask yourself that will help you transform your resume from a bland rehash of your job description to an eye-catching, interest grabbing narrative – these resume tips will help you stand out from other job seekers as you consider new opportunities.

 

What projects have I participated in?

What was the project’s purpose?

What problem was it meant to solve?

What was my role?

What was the result? (quantify the results to the best of your ability)

How did my involvement impact the results?

What was I able to do that made the project a success?

Provide as many examples of projects you’ve participated in AND their results using quantifiable facts that your audience (the hiring manager) can related to.

 

The Point A / Point B exercise

POINT A: When I started in the role, what was the state of my department or the projects on my desk?

POINT B: When I finished in the role, what was the state of the department or the projects I was responsible for?

Often times, the Point A/Point B exercise will become the source of questions a hiring manager asks you to clarify and to drill down on – you’ll be able to tell your narrative of how the impact you personally had on your role, a department, key projects, and the business as a whole.

Hiring managers and recruiters are taking less and less time reviewing resumes – if you are not differentiating yourself from your peers, you are going to be left behind during the selection process.